How to Deadlift

How to Deadlift

How are deadlifts executed?

Deadlifts are a key exercise for strength conditioning that works the whole body. It is crucial to make sure you execute deadlifts properly to avoid injury. If you find yourself avoiding deadlifts because you aren't sure how to properly perform the exercise, you've come to the right place. This article would like to go through the top three deadlift forms and teach you how to execute the deadlift properly.
(reminder that we are not medical professionals, these tips are to be used at your own risk)

How to do a conventional deadlift:

  1. Start with a narrow foot stance (hip-wide) and your hands placed outside the knees. When it comes to neck positioning, your neck should be in a neutral position. Remember not to look up or down at your feet, try to look neutrally at the floor straight in front of you.
  2. Push your hips back, grab the bar shoulder-width apart and make sure your chest is parallel to the ground.
  3. Drop your hips down and pull up on the bar; engage your lats, shoulders, hips, and core. As you pull the bar up push your feet into the ground.
  4. Make sure the bar is straight and close to your body as it comes up from your knees to your hips, and hinge yourself forward.
  5. Take a breath and pull up the bar while allowing your hips to drop.
  6. Once done, drop or lower the bar to the floor.
  7. Once the weight plates reach the floor, the repetition is complete. Pause briefly and reset your position before beginning the next repetition.

How to do a Sumo deadlift:

  1. Start with your hips toward the bar, and stand in front of the barbell with your feet wider than your hips. Make sure to keep your neck and head in a neutral position Your feet should be angled at 45 degrees out from the centerline of your body. Your knees should track over your toes.
  2. Pre-tension your shoulders, hips, and core with good inhale and exhale before lowering toward the barbell.
  3. Hinge from your hips back and bend your hips and knees to lower your body toward the barbell.
  4. Grab the barbell and engage your back muscles by rotating your arms until the inner elbow faces forward. Your chest should be high and your shoulders slightly over the top of the bar. All repetitions should begin from this position.
  5. Maintaining a neutral spine/neck position and keep the barbell close to your body. Pull the bar up and push your feet through the floor. As you stand, squeeze your glutes and allow your hips to travel forward, keeping your arms long. Your shoulders should finish directly over the hips at the end of each repetition.
  6. Begin the downward movement with a neutral spine, and hinge from your hips until the barbell reaches your knees. Then, lower the barbell to the floor.
  7. Once the weight plates reach the floor, the repetition is complete. Pause briefly and reset your position before beginning the next repetition.

How to do a trap bar deadlift 

  1. Start standing in the middle of your trap bar. Stand tall with your feet shoulder/hip-width apart. Your shoulders should be over your hips with a neutral neck position. Your arms remain by your sides with a slight bend in your elbows. Tuck your chin and stabilize your feet with actual weight. 
  2. Bend your knees and go down to grab a grip on either side of the bar
  3. Engage your lats, shoulders, hips, back and core. Push your hips back to feel stretching in the backs of your legs. 
  4. While maintaining a neutral spine, keep the trap bar centred and pull upward by pushing your feet through the floor. Stand and squeeze your glutes and push your hips forward. Your shoulders should finish directly over your hips.
  5. As you begin to lower the trap bar, focus on keeping the bar centred and maintain a neutral spine. Hinge from your hips, allowing your knees to bend to lower the trap bar back toward the floor.
  6. Once the weight plates reach the floor, the repetition is complete. Pause briefly and reset your position before beginning the next repetition.
 
This site offers health, fitness, and nutritional opinionative information and is only designed for educational purposes. You should not rely on this information as a substitute, nor does it replace professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. The use of any information provided on this site is solely read at your own risk. If you have any concerns or questions about your health, you should always consult with a physician or other healthcare professional. 

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